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Short Term Loans Against Fine Art and Antiques

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Many people like to hang art in their houses and have a couple of antiques on display in the hopes that they will beautify their homes. What they may not realize is that they have a potential goldmine available to them if they want to take short term loans. More and more often, people are using their art and antiques as collateral to get short term loans so that they can go on holiday, repair their cars, pay their bills, or even beautify their homes further.

People often inherit art and antiques, or find these pieces in stores, but they sometimes don’t realize the value that they have at their disposal. With those items, getting a short term loan is pretty easy. All you need to do is take the items to a company that offers short term loans for an assessment. Many companies will even come to your home to assess larger items, or those items you don’t feel comfortable transporting for security reasons. They will assess the item and determine its worth, and give a short term loan based on that.

So what is your part in this deal? Well, anyone who gets short term loans against fine art and antiques needs to know that they have to meet their monthly premium. If they don’t, they risk the items they put for collateral being repossessed, something that no one wants to deal with. However, for many people, a company that does such a trade will also give good advice and will allow them to determine how much they can afford and whether the process is really right for them.

Getting these loans is relatively easy, but the smart investor understands that in the long term, these items can increase greatly in value. That is why it is beneficial to get short term loans against fine art and antiques, rather than selling them for the cash. This will allow extra income on a short term basis so that you can do whatever you need to do, but ensure that you don’t give up on your investment, which could pay out much more later down the line.

Image: Freedigitalphotos.net/scottchan


About Kim Parr

Kim Parr is a private practice optometrist, freelance writer, and personal financial blogger. You can follow her journey to 20/20 financial vision at Eyes on the Dollar.

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